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Archive for the ‘Public Speaking’ Category

The 3 Big RIPPLE EFFECTS When YOUR TEAM is NOT Set Up for SUCCESS

Posted on: December 14th, 2016 | by Bill Kenney

CTCollegiateBizPlanCompetition14SpringPutting people in situations where they can succeed is the essence of good leadership. When our teams and team members fail there can be many adverse effects. The repercussions can go far beyond those directly involved. Check out this list to see some of the other stakeholders and how they are affected.

For the Under-performing TEAMS and TEAM MEMBERS

  • Their performance spirals down as they see no path to success
  • They disengage and turnover
  • They become anti-sponsors of your organization and you

For the CUSTOMERS and AUDIENCE

  • Poor individual performance leads to poor service
  • Continued poor service leads to lost customers
  • Lost customers leads to negative promotion

For Other TEAMS and TEAM MEMBERS

  • They observe and learn less productive methods and processes
  • They carry more load when their peers and teammates under-perform
  • They get frustrated, disengage and turnover

For SUPERVISORS, MANAGERS and OWNERS

  • It costs you time, reputation and results as team members don’t realize their potential
  • Your sales and revenue declines, customers and reputation are lost
  • Team members will turnover creating production instability and your career path becomes vulnerable

 

Join us for the “Stop Defining Insanity: Set Them Up for Success” webinar on Monday, December 19 at Noon ET. More information and register.

 

About
Test My Pitch – Private communication skill development platform. Think Toastmasters online. Engage, empower and accelerate your communities communication confidence and competence.

Ask us how we can help you successfully democratize pitch event results in your community. Email or call Bill Kenney today at bkenney@testmypitch.com or +1 (860) 573-4821.

Avoiding Onboarding Obstacles: Ramp Up Success Quickly

Posted on: October 17th, 2016 | by tmpadmin

Avoiding Onboarding Obstacles

Ramp Up Success Quickly

Learn the secrets of high-functioning organizations

Date: Thursday, November 10, 2016
Time: Noon – 1:00PM (EDT)

New performers launch without skills and performance lags. Managers time gets hijacked and isn’t well leveraged. New team members are unintentionally set up to fail. There is limited visibility to Individual potential. Little alignment exists between participant start date and training cycle. Results vary by location and manager. Successful onboarding learning isn’t leveraged for future candidates.

Join us for this fast moving and highly informative workshop that will help you jumpstart results from new performers.

This workshop will help you improve your new team member:

  • Selection
  • Training
  • Measurement
  • Accountability
  • Continual development

Eliminate the frustrations and costs of ineffective onboarding. Join us on Thursday, November 10 for this groundbreaking webinar.

Space is limited. Enroll today.

Criteria Conundrum: Developing Your Ultimate Pitch Evaluation Rubric

Posted on: August 25th, 2016 | by Bill Kenney

Learn the secrets of high-functioning ecosystems

Watch the webinar recording!

Date: Tuesday, August 23, 2016
Time: Noon – 1:00PM (EDT)

  • Do your judges and mentors misapply your criteria?
  • Would you like more informative and reliable results?
  • Are you challenged to pick the best teams or ventures?
  • Do your final scores inform and educate appropriately?
  • Would you like better judge and team orientation?

Join us for this fast moving and highly informative workshop that will help you create the best possible criteria and judging system for your purpose.

Poor criteria and judge orientation compromises the reliability of pitch event results. When results are reliable participants have reference points to model and improve performance quickly. Learn how with a few simple tips you can create IMPACT and exceptional FEEDBACK for your entrepreneurs!

This workshop will help you:

  • Understand the common challenges and critical success factors
  • Create the remedies that are right for your system
  • Learn what to prioritize and how to do it
  • Develop the best rubric for your needs
  • Select and orient judges appropriately

All participants will receive the Score My Pitch – Criteria Development Worksheet to build your ultimate criteria

Over the last three years, our team has been visiting, interviewing and serving universities and entrepreneurship ecosystems all around the world. We’ve been to more than 500 pitch events and demo days in that time. We’d like to share with you some of the learning and best practices that we are gaining through this experience.

Join us for this action packed and interactive session.

We limit these webinars to 50 participants, so register now to reserve your spot.

Practice, It’s Not Just for Olympians

Posted on: August 15th, 2016 | by tmpadmin

Lavern practice

With the Olympics in “full on” mode at the moment, a post about practice seems like a perfect topic. Bobby Knight, the one-time Olympic basketball coach from Indiana University said “The key is not the “will to win” . . . everybody has that. It is the will to prepare to win that is important.”

Imagine if your professionals, students or entrepreneurs could execute their communication like a gold medal winning Olympic athlete competes in their event. How much better would your team perform? Imagine if they could articulate a podium worthy value proposition, class presentation or venture pitch. Imagine if they could connect with the audience and compel them to action. Would they sell more? Would they get better grades or a better career path? Would they raise more money?

Indeed champion athletes and award-winning performance artists embrace volumes of focused practice to assure peak performance. While the numbers vary considerably by sport and art form, athletes and performing artists practice somewhere between 2-50 times more than they play in actual games or perform shows. They train physically and mentally, they do dress rehearsals and walkthroughs and they focus on specific skills some days and the entire game or performance others.

Practice is safe and collegial. Practice might also be competitive to replicate a game environment or opening night performance. The championship is not won in practice, but it can be lost by how we practice. Practice helps individuals evolve from conscious competence to unconscious competence. The best practices see performers stretching beyond their current skill set to manifest higher levels of ability.

Watch this brief video where Michael Jordan shares his thoughts on the importance of practice.

Athletes and artists who don’t practice, don’t play. Practices are mandatory and integrated into the performance process. Practice is not only a base requirement, it is essential to maintaining and evolving skills. The emphasis on practice doesn’t stop when athletes and performers move from junior levels to the Olympics or professional ranks. In fact, practices get longer, harder and more sophisticated as performers mature towards their peak. Specialized coaches, trainers and consultants are hired to maximize performance at the top levels.

So here are a couple of challenge questions, if your team isn’t prepared and communicating at a gold medal level:

  • What’s your team’s practice to performance ratio? Remember top athletes and artists practice 2 to 50 times more than they play and perform.
  • Do you have a method to diagnose each individual’s skill and performance gaps? Left to our own devices, most of us will practice our strengths and ignore our weaknesses. Identifying and overcoming deficiencies is where major performance leaps occur.
  • Are you providing good benchmarks and references? While each individual understanding their performance and growth opportunities is important, this information is abstract. Seeing their performance in comparison to peers and past performers creates even better reference points. Sometimes it is hard to improve until you know what better looks like.

As Aristotle said, “We are what we repeatedly do. Greatness then is not an act, but a habit”.

About
Test My Pitch – Private communication skill development platform. Think Toastmasters online. Engage, empower and accelerate your communities communication confidence and competence.

Ask us how we can help you improve your team’s success through practice. Email or call Bill Kenney today at bkenney@testmypitch.com or +1 (860) 573-4821.

You Can’t Go “Off-Script” Until You Have a Script

Posted on: July 20th, 2016 | by Bill Kenney

Mark Twain famously said, “It usually takes me more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.

Like Twain, most speakers and presenters want to be spontaneous. They want to be that rare charismatic individual who can evolve their message to the mood and interests of the audience in the moment. Truly there is no more powerful form of speaking than extemporaneous speech. Being nimble and adjusting your message and delivery real-time takes considerable experience and skill. Attempting impromptu speech without the needed experience and skill can be disastrous and lead to lost sales, investment, credibility and relationships.

Developing the skill of impromptu speech is complex. A speaker not only needs to be a good communicator but also needs to have domain expertise and be able read their audience and adjust their message dynamically. To be a “good” communicator means that the speaker is unconsciously competent at speaking in public. We all start at conscious competence. Which is to say that, in the beginning, we have to think about and awkwardly execute every step in the process to deliver a modest speech.

Consider a driver who is new to operating a manual transmission car. They first have to learn steps to depress the clutch and move the shifter into position. They do this first with the engine off and the emergency brake on. As they build this skill to reasonable competence, they progress to shifting while the engine is on and then to driving in an empty parking lot and then driving in a quiet neighborhood and so on. By the time they progress to driving on highways or a busy urban setting their skills have evolved to a place where shifting a manual transmission is second nature. In other words, they are unconsciously competent at shifting.

Elevating your team’s ability to respond in the moment to the needs of their audience, requires them first to be a practiced domain speaker.

About
Test My Pitch – Private communication skill development platform. Think Toastmasters online. Engage, empower and accelerate your communities communication confidence and competence.

Ask us how we can help you successfully democratize pitch event results in your community. Email or call Bill Kenney today at bkenney@testmypitch.com or +1 (860) 573-4821.

Stop Thinking and Start Doing: The Power of Practicing More

Posted on: March 25th, 2016 | by tmpadmin

This a really powerful article about the value of practice in skill building. Look at the ratio of practice to competition for athletes or the ration of practice to performing for any type of performing artist. Do business professionals practice to perform at similar ratios? What would change if they did?

Enjoy!

Reprinted from Medium. Written by @james_clear

Stop Thinking and Start Doing: The Power of Practicing More

We all have goals that we want to achieve in our lives. These goals may include learning a new language, eating healthier and losing weight, becoming a better parent, saving more money, and so on.

It can be easy to assume that the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future is caused by a lack of knowledge. This is why we buy courses on how to start a business or how to lose weight fast or how to learn a new language in three months. We assume that if we knew about a better strategy, then we would get better results. We believe that a new result requires new knowledge.

What I’m starting to realize, however, is that new knowledge does not necessarily drive new results. In fact, learning something new can actually be a waste of time if your goal is to make progress and not simply gain additional knowledge.

It all comes down to the difference between learning and practicing.

The Difference Between Learning and Practicing
In Thomas Sterner’s book, The Practicing Mind (audiobook), he explains the key difference between practicing and learning.

“When we practice something, we are involved in the deliberate repetition of a process with the intention of reaching a specific goal. The words deliberate and intention are key here because they define the difference between actively practicing something and passively learning it.”  — Thomas Sterner, The Practicing Mind

Learning something new and practicing something new may seem very similar, but these two methods can have profoundly different results. Here are some additional ways to think about the difference.

  • Let’s say your goal is to get stronger and more fit. You can research the best instructions on bench press technique, but the only way to build strength is to practice lifting weights.
  • Let’s say your goal is to grow your startup. You can learn about the best way to make a sales pitch, but the only way to actually land customers is to practice making sales calls.
  • Let’s say your goal is to write a book. You can talk to a best-selling author about writing, but the only way become a better writer is to practice publishing consistently.

Passive learning creates knowledge. Active practice creates skill.

Let’s consider three more reasons to prioritize active practice over passive learning.

  1. Learning Can Be a Crutch That Supports InactionIn many cases, learning is actually a way to avoid taking action on the goals and interests that we say are important to us. For example, let’s say you want to learn a foreign language. Reading a book on how to learn a foreign language quickly allows you to feel like you are making progress (“Hey, I’m figuring out the best way to do this!”). Of course, you’re not actually practicing the action that would deliver your desired outcome (speaking the foreign language).

    In situations like this one, we often claim that we are preparing or researching the best method, but these rationalizations allow us to feel like we are moving forward when we are merely spinning our wheels. We make the mistake of being in motion rather than taking action. Learning is valuable until it becomes a form of procrastination.

  2. Practice Is Learning, But Learning Is Not PracticePassive learning is not a form of practice because although you gain new knowledge, you are not discovering how to apply that knowledge. Active practice, meanwhile, is one of the greatest forms of learning because the mistakes you make while practicing reveal important insights.

    Even more important, practice is the only way to make a meaningful contribution with your knowledge. You can watch an online course about how to build a business or read an article about a terrible disaster in a developing nation, but that knowledge is unproductive unless you actually launch your business or donate to those in need. Learning by itself can be valuable for you, but if you want to be valuable to others, then you have to express your knowledge in some way.

  3. Practice Focuses Your Energy on the Process“Progress is a natural result of staying focused on the process of doing anything.”  — Thomas Sterner, The Practicing Mind

    The state of your life right now is a result of the habits and beliefs that you have been practicing each day. When you realize this and begin to direct your focus toward practicing better habits day-in and day-out, continual progress will be the logical outcome. It is not the things we learn nor the dreams we envision that determines our results, but rather that habits that we practice each day. Fall in love with boredom and focus your energy on the process, not the product.

The Bottom Line
Is passive learning useless? Of course not. In many cases, learning for the sake of learning can be a beautiful thing. Not to mention that soaking up new information can help you make more informed decisions when you do decide to take action.

That said, the main point of this article is that learning by itself does not lead to progress. We often hide behind information and use learning as an excuse to delay the more difficult and more important choice of actually doing something. Spend less time passively learning and more time actively practicing. Stop thinking and start doing.

Standout in 30-Seconds for Professionals

Posted on: March 14th, 2016 | by tmpadmin

Standout in 30-Seconds

Connect at every opportunity

Make your networking self-introduction ROCK!

ConfusedGuy.jpg

  • Do you get anxious or nervous?
  • Do you forget what you wanted to say?
  • Do you wish you had a clear and powerful message?
  • Is your value proposition simple and effective?
  • Do you wish your introduction would attract the right people?

Join our Standout in 30-Seconds program and deliver your compelling self-introduction with confidence every time.

Our system will help you develop an effective script and then practice and perfect your delivery.

What’s included:

  • Two (2) x 1-hour workshops – delivered live online and recorded
    • Introduction to Standing Out (Monday, April 11 at 4pm ET)
      • getting started
      • creating a script
      • delivery techniques
    • Advanced Standing Out (Monday, April 25 at 4pm ET)
      • assessing the audience
      • developing a hook
      • closing with confidence
  • Three (3) rounds of formalized practice rounds with feedback from our expert coaches on the Test My Pitch platform.

 

Register by Friday, April 1 and SAVE $30

More Information

Price = $149 if you register by April 1, 2016

 

Subject to the standard Test My Pitch Term of Use.

Test My Pitch is a product of Test My Pitch, LLC

Questions to Date – Criteria Conundrum: Developing Your Ultimate Rubric

Posted on: January 13th, 2016 | by Bill Kenney

Here’s a quick highlight of participant questions that have already been posed so far for the January 22, 2016 webinar – Criteria Conundrum: Developing Your Ultimate Rubric. For more details or to register click here.

The question we posed
What questions or challenges do you have related to developing the effective criteria?

The responses to-date

  • How do we get untrained judges to use rubrics reliably and quickly?
  • How to override the judges’ own biases?
  • How to have an efficient system that taps into key competencies of students and is easily understood by a diverse judging team.
  • When judges are exposed to multiple pitches back to back, the baseline for how the pitches are ranked starts to shift. If the first team had an strong performance they might be scoring the one right after that a bit more harshly compared to the rest. The same problem if the opposite happens, a weak team making an average performance after have inflated numbers. What happens is judging scores, tallied up end up looking a bit skewed and judges would prefer to discuss the results vs. relying purely on the numerical scores?

  • Are there differences between criteria to evaluate pitch competitions and for adult in class presentations?
  • How do you best create consistency in the application of criteria?
  • How do you get all judges to use the same scale when completing the rubric?
  • How do you adjust the criteria based upon the audience?
  • What are the top 3 steps to creating valuable criteria?
  • What makes criteria effective?
  • As our programs have undergone various evolutions, first starting with rigorous and multiple (maybe onerous) criteria, we have had to “water down” our criteria in an attempt to get more people to take part in a program. This is frustrating and in the end cheapens program value. How do we create meaningful criteria that is both objective and simple?
  • How to communicate criteria so that judges interpret it the way we meant them to?
  • How to picking criteria that are correct?
  • How to adapt criteria to compensate for the natural irrational human factor?
  • What are the most important elements to include in innovator/innovation assessment criteria?
  • We are coordinating two grant processes this year. What are the best practices for judging and comparing proposals?

Responses outside the topic area

  • What is the most powerful opening / statement pertaining to a sales pitch? By whom? Is it used for every sale?

For more webinar details or to register click here.

View our past webinars.

Listening Skill Development Exercises to Improve Communication Skills – Part II

Posted on: December 17th, 2015 | by tmpadmin

10 Exercises To Improve Listening Skills And Become An Active Listener

Why do we need exercises to improve listening skills? Because we do, that’s why. Because practice makes perfect.

How to improve listening skills? Just pay attention and you will learn that. Listening skills are crucial if you want to have a good relationship with others. Some people have listening skills while most don’t have them (or at least they don’t think they have any listening skills).

Actually, we all have listening skills, some more than others, but we all have at least some skills, we just don’t use them often and they tend to get rusty over time. This is why we need some listening skills exercises. Hopefully, by the end of this article, you will realize the importance of listening.

So the question now is how to improve listening skills? Now, improving listening skills is not an easy task, but it can be done.

Here are 10 of the most useful exercises to improve listening skills (you can call them active listening activities):

Exercise to improve listening skills no. 1 The “don’t interrupt” exercise.

Make a habit of not interrupting the person(s) that is/are talking to you. As simple as this may seem, it is very important that you abide this rule. Just this one thing, done right, represents a great exercise to improve your listening skills. The main idea here is to remember that improving your listening skills means to stop talking and paying attention to what others are saying. Remember that you only learn new things if you shut up and listen. When you talk you learn almost nothing new. So, this is another good reason why you should be quiet and listen to others without interrupting. So if you were wondering how to improve listening skills, now you know one way to do it.

Whenever you’re in a discussion, let the speaker finish his statement before trying to reply. If you absolutely need to interrupt the speaker or maybe raise a point, you have to be patient until you get a chance.

How to improve your listening skills?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills. This is why we call them active listening activities, because they are active:

Take a notebook with you and write down all the discussions that you have today. Write down for each discussion: what was the subject of it, who talked more – you or the other person(s), what do you know more now after this discussion, that you didn’t know before. By writing all this down for at least 5-6 discussions, you will know exactly what level of listening skills you have at the moment.

For this exercise to give even better results it is best that someone (your wife/husband,friend,etc) is with you. This way, after you write down all of the above, the other person can read that and tell you how much is true or not and this way you will know were you are and in time you will begin to see the improvements a lot easier. You have to be patient and do this exercise at least 10 times to see some improvements, so go ahead and start now!

How to improve listening skills exercises no. 2 Asking questions means paying attention and it is an essential part of the active listening activities.

A great exercise to improve listening skills is to ask questions throughout a conversation. Asking the right questions at the right time is gold here. If you ask, people will know that you are listening to what they are saying, you will keep a lively conversation, prevent any possible misunderstandings and most importantly, you will develop your listening skills.

Be careful not to overdo it on the questions though! If you pass a certain number of questions, you will become annoying and no one will want to talk to you in the future.
DO IT NOW! (active listening activities remember?) What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

Set yourself a goal for today to ask a couple of questions on the first conversation you participate in today. 3 to 6 questions is a reasonable number to start with. After that, set a goal for the next week. Make it a habit of yours to ask questions in every conversation. This way you will learn new things and improve your listening skills as well.

When you ask questions, try not to ask more than one question at a time so that the other person has time to respond to it. It is possible, that the speaker may become silent for some time(this happens often in a conversation). When this happens, do not try to rush and fill up the silence. Instead, you should give the speaker a chance to compose his/her thoughts.

Active listening skills exercises for improving listening skills no. 3 “I see”

One of the difference between hearing and listening is that when you are listening you can try to give some acknowledgments, from time to time, to the person that’s talking so they know that you are really listening. Words like “I see”, “Aha…”, “Yes”, “I know”, “I understand”, “I know the feeling”, and you can name even more are of great help.
You can even start to summarize with your own words what you understood. Summarizing has its benefits like preventing misunderstandings and keeping the liveliness of the conversation. It prevents misunderstandings in the sense that if you didn’t understand something correctly, then the speaker can set you straight after you summarize what was it that you understood.

Summarizing also keeps you implicated in the discussion by preventing your attention from wondering far away.

How to improve your listening skills?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

Make it one of your habits to use acknowledgments and to summarize conversations. Try this in any discussion and you and the others around you will see improvements in your listening skills.

Exercise to improve listening skills no. 4 Are you willing to become a good listener?

You have to know that there are some difference between hearing and listening. If you want to have good listening skills you first have to willing to take the steps involved, to be willing to make the effort. Nothing is free, and gaining listening skills doesn’t make any difference. If you are willing that’s great, but if you’re not, maybe the next benefits of having good listening skills will change your mind.

4 great benefits of being a good listener (why you should be improving listening skills):

  1. If you learn how to listen to others, the others will listen to what you have to say as well, they will respect you because you show respect to them by listening. You’re words will have a greater influence on other people. This is a great thing! Just imagine having a greater influence on your children, friends, family, work colleagues. Wouldn’t this be wonderful?
  2. By being a good listener, you can learn more about the people you talk to, you can make new friends and have a better life, both personal and professional. What if you could be good friends with almost everyone you talk to? How would you feel if your boss was your friend? How about your neighbors, colleagues or even customers? It can all be possible if you only listen to others more.
  3. By becoming a good listener you could even improve existent relationships. When people will see that you’ve become more attentive to what they say they will treat you better and you will then realize the importance of listening. Just think: wouldn’t you treat someone better if they were listening to you and support you?
  4. Having good listening skills will help you improve conversation skills.

This way you will be able to avoid a lot of misunderstandings or confusions. You could also stop possible conflicts even before they start. As you see there are some important benefits of being a good listener, and I’m sure you can dig out more if you try. You should always remember that by doing active listening activities you will become better and better at this. So, what are you waiting for? You should be out there, improving listening skills right now?

How to improve your listening skills?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

Start changing the way that you listen to people. Pay more attention to them and try to understand what they are really trying to say. The more you care about them the more they will care for you. There is an old saying that goes like this: “You get hungry while eating.” and this goes for willingness too.

You will become more willing to improve your listening skills by having more and more conversations. Just try paying attention and carrying about others and you will feel a huge difference in time.

Exercise to improve listening skills no. 5 Keep your eyes on the “ball”

The difference between hearing and listening is that one is active while the other one isn’t. So pay attention only to what the speaker has to say. If you focus only on the speaker and what he/her is talking about and not trying to make up your own replies, you will gain more from the conversation. Also, by doing so, you won’t miss a lot of things the speaker might say.
How to improve listening skills today?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

This is one of the very interesting listening skills exercises. Do the following with the first person that you talk to after reading this: focus completely on that person, don’t allow your thoughts to run away, keep your eyes and ears on what the person is saying. Ask him/her questions about what they’ve said. You will be amazed at how happy you will make that person after you’ve had your little talk. If the conversation is a short one, try to find someone else and have a longer conversation so that this exercise is effective.

Active listening skills exercises no. 6 Respect me and I will respect you as well.

It is important that you show and have respect for the speaker. If you respect the other person you will pay more attention to him/her. On the other hand, if you don’t respect the person that much, you won’t be very attentive.

If you make this a habit, I mean respecting people, you will see that those people (most of them) will give you a higher level of respect as well. You first have to give so that you can receive.
How to improve listening skills today?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

Make a conscious effort to develop a genuine interest for others and what they have to say. We all are special in our own way and we can all learn from each other. Try to consider every people that you talk to, a good friend of yours. How would you treat a friend? That’s right, you would pay attention to that friend because you like him/her, you enjoy spending time together, etc.

Try to do this with anyone. It might be a little hard at first, and for some people you may not be able to feel the same as you would to a friend, but, please, give your best at it. And try and try again, and again, and again… Improving your listening skills is not easy but it’s more than worth it.

Exercise to improve listening skills no. 7 Repeat it and write it down.

In the middle of a conversation, the speaker might say something very interesting for you. You want to remember that but you also want to pay attention to what the speaker is currently saying, so what do you do? You repeat that information. Immediately. Out loud. Read the following to see an example.

How to improve listening skills today? A way to start improving listening skills is to: DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

You can use this as a helper: “Did I understand this right? Did you just say that …..” This way you will re-repeat the information and you will also make the other person repeat it again (in some cases, the speaker will only say yes and move on – this is why you can deliberately repeat the information with a little error in it. This way you can be sure that the other person will repeat it as well. It’s almost 100% guaranteed!).

Also, if you want to be even more sure that you will remember the information, as soon as you get the chance, write it down on a piece of paper.

Active listening skills exercises no. 8 Keep eye contact

Active listening skills exercises don’t just mean that all you have to is to be a good listener. It also means that you need to keep your eyes on the person which is talking. Keep eye contact at all times. It’s very important that you do this because this way the conversations will be more pleasant and you and the speaker will learn a lot from each other.
How to improve listening skills today?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

The next time you talk to others, face the speaker and watch them in the eye. What you say will make a greater impact on people if you keep eye contact. Also do this when the speaker is talking. This way, he/her will feel appreciated and respected.

Exercise to improve listening skills no. 9 Feedback Time

It is very important (and I recommend this) to give feedback to people, especially if they ask for it. Sometimes people won’t ask for this, but if you feel that you’ve had a pleasant conversation with someone and you have something to say, then give feedback to that person.

How to improve your listening skills?

DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

If you have something good to say, something that you liked about the other person or the way he/she talked, always say it. Don’t keep that all for yourself. Anyone likes to be complimented and if you liked something it’s much better to say it loud.

What do I do if I have some negative feedback? If you didn’t like something, you have two options: you can either keep it to yourself (some things are better left unsaid), or if you just have to say it, do it in a smoother way. Don’t just throw it out as if you didn’t care about the person’s feelings. Be gentle, say something good about the person and then point out what you wanted to say. Here’s an example:

Let’s say that you’ve just had a conversation with a good friend about a tv commercial. You both liked one commercial, but you don’t agree with something
that your friend said. How do you tell him this without making him angry? Say something like: “Hey, John I really liked having this talk with you. I always enjoy talking about tv commercials with you because you’re a funny guy. I agree about what you said earlier …., and I also feel that ….(here will be the “negative” feedback – as smoother as you can).

Active listening skills exercises no. 10 Be yourself

It is very important that you feel good in a conversation. You must be relaxed and comfortable. This way, the chances are that you will be more attentive to the speaker. If you feel some sort of discomfort, you won’t be able to pay attention to the discussion.

How to improve listening skills today? A way to start improving listening skills is to: DO IT NOW! What to do today so that this exercise really does improve your listening skills:

Start having conversations with people that you feel comfortable talking to. Use all the knowledge you’ve gathered from this article. By first talking to people that you feel good with, you will make this a little test for future times when you will talk to other people. Once you start paying attention to people you will realize the importance of listening to others.

If you use all of these active listening activities/listening skills exercises you will improve your listening skills and you will become an active listener. People will enjoy talking to you and you will have a greater influence on others. Your whole life will improve, but it’s not enough that you’ve read “Listening skills exercises – 10 Exercises to Improve Listening Skills and Become an Active Listener”, you have to read it again, write down what you think is important for you and start using it until it becomes a habit for you.

Listening Skill Development Exercises to Improve Communication Skills – Part I

Posted on: December 16th, 2015 | by tmpadmin

These listening skill development exercises are compiled from:

6 Listening Skills Exercises To Promote Stronger Communication
content courtesy of the Udemy Blog. Article written by C. Paris

The act of listening is not the same as hearing. When someone is communicating with you, they want to feel like they’re talking to you, rather than at you, and that can only be done with a set of good listening skills and an understanding of the principles of effective communication in general.

Learn how to become an empathetic, attentive, and active listener with the listening skills exercises listed below. You can also review this guide on the numerous components of the listening process for reference.

A Game of Telephone

Telephone might be considered a child’s game, but it’s actually a very useful exercise in communication that those working to improve their own or their team’s listening skills can benefit from greatly. The rules are simple, but altered slightly to shed additional light on the importance of active listening, and how information can become distorted as a result of laziness, inattentiveness, and passivity… all enemies of effective communication.

To start the game, participants should stand in a line, or a circle. One person begins the game by whispering a sentence to the person after them. This sentence should be prepared beforehand, by someone moderating the game, but it should only be known to the person starting the game. The person who received the messages should then whisper it to the person after them, and so on.

By the time it gets to the final person in the group, they should say the message aloud. The first person will read the sentence they were given, and participants can note how much the two have changed. It’s very unlikely, especially in large groups, that the message has not been altered at least a little bit.

The additional rule teams can add to make this exercise more lucid is for each participant to keep a small note card. After they hear the message – not during, but after – they should write down what they heard, and read it to the person next to them. This way, any slight change in the message is down on paper, and the group moderator can post these note cards up in front of the room. Then, the team can study how subtle changes in word use, slight additions or eliminations, can significantly alter the meaning of any message.

Selective Listening

Selective listening is the act of hearing and interpreting only parts of a message that seem relevant to you, while ignoring or devaluing the rest. Often, selective listeners will form arguments before they’ve heard the full story, making them not only poor listeners, but poor speakers too!

To confront this in a group environment, one moderator should compose a list of objects or ideas, all similar in theme. For example: turkey, lettuce, tomato, mayo, mustard, cheese, etc. These are all sandwich components, and most people will recognize this. The list should be relatively long, maybe 15 to 20 words, and have some repeated words. For example: turkey, lettuce, tomato, mayo, mustard, cheese, ham, lettuce, pickles, onion, olives, lettuce…

The moderator should read this list to the group, and then allot them 30 seconds to write down as many words as they can remember. Most people will remember the word that was repeated the most, and a notable amount will most likely write down words that were obvious, but not actually stated in the list. For example: bread, sandwich, or food.

Group Storytelling

A good listener should be able to view a discussion as a whole, and not just its most immediate parts. The group storytelling activity is a fun, potentially silly, but incredibly valuable exercise in active listening and comprehension.

This activity should have one group moderator, who will deliver the story’s first line. It should be something simple, and open for many possible continuations, such as, “So the other day, I went to the store.”

Each participant in the group is responsible for making up their own contribution to the story, a single sentence that logically continues from the last. Meanwhile, the group moderator should be keeping track of the story on a computer or in a notepad, checking each addition for possible continuity errors.

Most of the time, there will be a few additions that contradict previous parts of the story. The moderator should hold out on identifying these until the full story has been written, and can be read aloud to the group. Then, the group can discuss how these mistakes were made, and what sorts of listening skills they should practice to ensure important information is never forgotten.

Additional Listening Skills Exercises

Here are more listening skills exercises that should help you and your team develop the listening skills they need for effective communication. Don’t forget to follow up each exercise with a discussion! Check out this communications guide for some talking points.

  • Read a short story, and have participants paraphrase. This activity is a study in how team members choose to interpret and prioritize certain information over others.
  • Pair up participants, and have one person discuss a hobby or passion of theirs, while the other person is instructed to ignore them. Discuss the frustration that can come with not feeling heard or acknowledged, and review good body language and verbal remarks a good listener should practice.
  • In pairs, one participant discusses a type of location they’d like to visit, giving only subtle hints as to the specific place. The listener will have to pick up on these subtleties and at the end, recommend somewhere suitable for the speaker based on their explanation. The original speaker will confirm or deny the usefulness of the suggestion, and the two will then discuss ways people can stay alert, as a listener, and pick up on the appropriate cues to help them play a more vital role in discussions.